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 Contrairement à ce qu'il Pensait, l'élection de Trump ne va pas arranger les affaires de Putin.

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MessageSujet: Contrairement à ce qu'il Pensait, l'élection de Trump ne va pas arranger les affaires de Putin.   Mer 16 Nov 2016, 09:19

D'après Giuliani, Les Etats Unis vont créer une gigantesque force militaire pour contre les ambitions de la Chine dans le Pacific et pour être capable de mener une guerre sur les deux océans.

Citation :
Donald Trump set to super-size military, says Rudy Giuliani



Rudy Giuliani says Donald Trump, as president, would follow through on his campaign promises to ­rejuvenate the US army and navy and prosecute global ‘peace through strength’.

The Australian
12:00AM November 16, 2016



@Adam_Creighton



The frontrunner to become ­Donald Trump’s secretary of state has revealed the US president-elect is committed to building a ­“gigantic” military force to thwart China’s ambitions in the Pacific.

Rudy Giuliani, the New York mayor during the terror attacks of September 11, 2001, and who is ­assisting Mr Trump’s transition to the White House, said yesterday the military expansion would be designed to allow the US to fight a “two-ocean war’’.

The hawkish comments are a strong sign the Trump adminis­tration will not neglect the Asia-­Pacific region, and follow the president-elect’s criticisms during the election campaign that America’s NATO allies and Japan were not pulling their weight.

“We (will) take our military up to 550,000 troops (instead of) going to 420,000,’’ Mr Giuliani told global business leaders in Washington. “We (will) take our navy up to 350 ships, (instead of) going to 247.

“At 350, China can’t match us in the Pacific. At 247 ships, we can’t fight a two-ocean war; we gave up the Pacific. If you face them with a military that is modern, gigantic, overwhelming and unbelievably good at conventional and asymmetric warfare, they may challenge it, but I doubt it.”

Defence Industry Minister Christopher Pyne, in a speech in Canberra today, will say the flow-on effects of Mr Trump’s planned expansion of the US army, navy and air force would create ­“remarkable opportunities” for Australia’s defence industry.

‘We’re not a strategic bludger’OMore: ‘We’re not a strategic bludger’
Shorten surfs the populist tideOMore: Shorten surfs the populist tide
Making the media listen againOMore: Making the media listen again

In his first comments about Mr Trump’s victory in last week’s election, Mr Pyne will tell a Submarine Institute of Australia conference that Mr Trump’s stated commitment to a massive expansion of US military capability could offer a historic opportunity for the local defence industry. The industry employs about 23,000 people across 3000 companies.

“To give you an understanding of the scale of this increase, it ­includes 50,000 more army troops, 70 new naval warships, 100 air force planes and a dozen new marine battalions,” Mr Pyne will say. “This represents around half a trillion US dollar increase to the US defence budget over the next decade.

“This result could bring with it remarkable opportunities for the Australian defence industry and, thanks to the foresight of the Turnbull government, Australia is well positioned to grasp those ­opportunities.”

Government sources have told The Australian the potential windfall for Australian industry could be worth billions.

Mr Giuliani said Mr Trump, as president, would follow through on his campaign promises to ­rejuvenate the US army and navy and prosecute global “peace through strength”.

The remarks by Mr Giuliani, a Trump confidant and frontrunner to become secretary of state, come amid intense speculation about the make-up of the Trump cabinet and uncertainty over which of the president-elect’s policies, which include building a wall along the border with Mexico, will be given priority.

They clarify the likely direction of US military spending, which has fallen to about $US550 billion and is on track to fall to the lowest share of US GDP since World War II.

Mr Pyne said yesterday that Australia was well positioned to capitalise on the flow-on effects of the planned US military expansion. “Australia and the US have had a long history of co-operation … we are a true friend of the US and I look forward to working closely with the new defence secretary.

“At a time when the US is ­expanding capability, we are similarly focused. As we have demonstrated throughout the year, the government is putting defence at the very centre of our national policy agenda.”

This would include local companies supporting new contracts and developing new technology required to support the planned expansion of US forces under a Trump presidency.

Australia’s defence industry is preparing for an expansion on the back of the government’s planned $200bn program for military spending over the coming decade, based largely around a new fleet of submarines and frigates.

During the election campaign, Mr Trump lamented the state of the US military, saying cuts in capability were energising America’s enemies. “Our adversaries are chomping at the bit,” he said.

“We want to deter, avoid and prevent conflict through our unquestioned military strength.”

He proposed an increase in troops, navy ships and fighters worth an estimated $US90bn a year and said he would call on ­congress to reverse cuts in military spending agreed to in 2013.

Mr Trump claimed he could pay for these increases by slashing wasteful spending within the military bureaucracy, although experts are sceptical this would be enough to pay for the plan.

Mr Giuliani said Islamic State remained the US’s greatest short- term danger and defeat of ISIS would be the Trump adminis­tration’s top priority.

“I think the way we exited Iraq was the worst decision made in American history, which meant we turned them over to Iran, which means we turned Syria over to Iran, which meant we weren’t there when ISIS began to develop,” he said. “To be honest you’d have to say Iraq is a client state of Iran (now),” he said.

The Republican president-elect has been sharply critical of President Barack Obama’s decision to withdraw US forces from the Middle East from 2011. Since then, Iraq, Syria, Egypt and Libya have plunged into turmoil while ISIS has advanced.

Speaking with remarkable candour for a potential secretary of state, Mr Giuliani said he wanted China to be an economic competitor, but not a military one.

“They are a first world and third world country combined,” he said.

“(China) has two things to overcome that stand in the way of their being a great world power,” he said pointing to widespread poverty and large middle class that won’t tolerate authoritarianism for much longer.

“Russia thinks it’s a military competitor; it really isn’t; it’s our unwillingness under Obama to even threaten the use of our ­military.”

Mr Trump has been accused to being too close to Russian ­President Vladimir Putin, whose government was allegedly instrumental in helping WikiLeaks ­obtain Hillary Clinton’s email files that contributed to her defeat last week.

Australian Strategic Policy ­Institute executive director Peter Jennings said a Trump administration would have a “higher expectation of allies” and the US could exert greater pressure on Australia to increase its defence spending above the target of 2 per cent of GDP. He s said if such a request were made, the Turnbull government would have a “good alliance story to tell” but argued greater defence spending worked to the benefit of Australia at a time of growing regional uncertainty.

“Instead of patting ourselves on the back at the prospect of reaching 2 per cent of GDP (on defence spending) in a couple of years, that should be seen as the floor — not the ceiling.

“If we saw 2.5 per cent, that would be about another $15bn on top of where we’re at.”

He also said the two ocean war reference from Mr Giuliani was yet “another echo of the Reagan ­administration”, which he said ­assumed office in 1981 planning to expand the navy under a military doctrine that America should be able to fight two large conflicts at any one time.

Malcolm Turnbull revealed in a post-election conversation with Mr Trump that the president-elect had been ­“impressed” by Australia’s multi-billion-dollar naval shipbuilding program.

The Prime Minister said he had ­spoken to Mr Trump about ­Australia’s commitment to ­defence spending and was confident that the economic and security ­relationship between Australia and the US would remain strong under a Trump ­administration.

Additional reporting: Joe Kelly



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MessageSujet: Re: Contrairement à ce qu'il Pensait, l'élection de Trump ne va pas arranger les affaires de Putin.   Mer 16 Nov 2016, 11:51

Pourquoi ? Poutine avait l'intention de partir en conflit avec les US ?
SuperTrump est pote avec Vlad et ça vous énerve ...
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MessageSujet: Re: Contrairement à ce qu'il Pensait, l'élection de Trump ne va pas arranger les affaires de Putin.   Mer 16 Nov 2016, 12:16

SJA a écrit:
D'après Giuliani, Les Etats Unis vont créer une gigantesque force militaire pour contre les ambitions de la Chine dans le Pacific et pour être capable de mener une guerre sur les deux océans.

Citation :
Donald Trump set to super-size military, says Rudy Giuliani



Rudy Giuliani says Donald Trump, as president, would follow through on his campaign promises to ­rejuvenate the US army and navy and prosecute global ‘peace through strength’.

The Australian
12:00AM November 16, 2016



@Adam_Creighton



The frontrunner to become ­Donald Trump’s secretary of state has revealed the US president-elect is committed to building a ­“gigantic” military force to thwart China’s ambitions in the Pacific.

Rudy Giuliani, the New York mayor during the terror attacks of September 11, 2001, and who is ­assisting Mr Trump’s transition to the White House, said yesterday the military expansion would be designed to allow the US to fight a “two-ocean war’’.

The hawkish comments are a strong sign the Trump adminis­tration will not neglect the Asia-­Pacific region, and follow the president-elect’s criticisms during the election campaign that America’s NATO allies and Japan were not pulling their weight.

“We (will) take our military up to 550,000 troops (instead of) going to 420,000,’’ Mr Giuliani told global business leaders in Washington. “We (will) take our navy up to 350 ships, (instead of) going to 247.

“At 350, China can’t match us in the Pacific. At 247 ships, we can’t fight a two-ocean war; we gave up the Pacific. If you face them with a military that is modern, gigantic, overwhelming and unbelievably good at conventional and asymmetric warfare, they may challenge it, but I doubt it.”

Defence Industry Minister Christopher Pyne, in a speech in Canberra today, will say the flow-on effects of Mr Trump’s planned expansion of the US army, navy and air force would create ­“remarkable opportunities” for Australia’s defence industry.

‘We’re not a strategic bludger’OMore: ‘We’re not a strategic bludger’
Shorten surfs the populist tideOMore: Shorten surfs the populist tide
Making the media listen againOMore: Making the media listen again

In his first comments about Mr Trump’s victory in last week’s election, Mr Pyne will tell a Submarine Institute of Australia conference that Mr Trump’s stated commitment to a massive expansion of US military capability could offer a historic opportunity for the local defence industry. The industry employs about 23,000 people across 3000 companies.

“To give you an understanding of the scale of this increase, it ­includes 50,000 more army troops, 70 new naval warships, 100 air force planes and a dozen new marine battalions,” Mr Pyne will say. “This represents around half a trillion US dollar increase to the US defence budget over the next decade.

“This result could bring with it remarkable opportunities for the Australian defence industry and, thanks to the foresight of the Turnbull government, Australia is well positioned to grasp those ­opportunities.”

Government sources have told The Australian the potential windfall for Australian industry could be worth billions.

Mr Giuliani said Mr Trump, as president, would follow through on his campaign promises to ­rejuvenate the US army and navy and prosecute global “peace through strength”.

The remarks by Mr Giuliani, a Trump confidant and frontrunner to become secretary of state, come amid intense speculation about the make-up of the Trump cabinet and uncertainty over which of the president-elect’s policies, which include building a wall along the border with Mexico, will be given priority.

They clarify the likely direction of US military spending, which has fallen to about $US550 billion and is on track to fall to the lowest share of US GDP since World War II.

Mr Pyne said yesterday that Australia was well positioned to capitalise on the flow-on effects of the planned US military expansion. “Australia and the US have had a long history of co-operation … we are a true friend of the US and I look forward to working closely with the new defence secretary.

“At a time when the US is ­expanding capability, we are similarly focused. As we have demonstrated throughout the year, the government is putting defence at the very centre of our national policy agenda.”

This would include local companies supporting new contracts and developing new technology required to support the planned expansion of US forces under a Trump presidency.

Australia’s defence industry is preparing for an expansion on the back of the government’s planned $200bn program for military spending over the coming decade, based largely around a new fleet of submarines and frigates.

During the election campaign, Mr Trump lamented the state of the US military, saying cuts in capability were energising America’s enemies. “Our adversaries are chomping at the bit,” he said.

“We want to deter, avoid and prevent conflict through our unquestioned military strength.”

He proposed an increase in troops, navy ships and fighters worth an estimated $US90bn a year and said he would call on ­congress to reverse cuts in military spending agreed to in 2013.

Mr Trump claimed he could pay for these increases by slashing wasteful spending within the military bureaucracy, although experts are sceptical this would be enough to pay for the plan.

Mr Giuliani said Islamic State remained the US’s greatest short- term danger and defeat of ISIS would be the Trump adminis­tration’s top priority.

“I think the way we exited Iraq was the worst decision made in American history, which meant we turned them over to Iran, which means we turned Syria over to Iran, which meant we weren’t there when ISIS began to develop,” he said. “To be honest you’d have to say Iraq is a client state of Iran (now),” he said.

The Republican president-elect has been sharply critical of President Barack Obama’s decision to withdraw US forces from the Middle East from 2011. Since then, Iraq, Syria, Egypt and Libya have plunged into turmoil while ISIS has advanced.

Speaking with remarkable candour for a potential secretary of state, Mr Giuliani said he wanted China to be an economic competitor, but not a military one.

“They are a first world and third world country combined,” he said.

“(China) has two things to overcome that stand in the way of their being a great world power,” he said pointing to widespread poverty and large middle class that won’t tolerate authoritarianism for much longer.

“Russia thinks it’s a military competitor; it really isn’t; it’s our unwillingness under Obama to even threaten the use of our ­military.”

Mr Trump has been accused to being too close to Russian ­President Vladimir Putin, whose government was allegedly instrumental in helping WikiLeaks ­obtain Hillary Clinton’s email files that contributed to her defeat last week.

Australian Strategic Policy ­Institute executive director Peter Jennings said a Trump administration would have a “higher expectation of allies” and the US could exert greater pressure on Australia to increase its defence spending above the target of 2 per cent of GDP. He s said if such a request were made, the Turnbull government would have a “good alliance story to tell” but argued greater defence spending worked to the benefit of Australia at a time of growing regional uncertainty.

“Instead of patting ourselves on the back at the prospect of reaching 2 per cent of GDP (on defence spending) in a couple of years, that should be seen as the floor — not the ceiling.

“If we saw 2.5 per cent, that would be about another $15bn on top of where we’re at.”

He also said the two ocean war reference from Mr Giuliani was yet “another echo of the Reagan ­administration”, which he said ­assumed office in 1981 planning to expand the navy under a military doctrine that America should be able to fight two large conflicts at any one time.

Malcolm Turnbull revealed in a post-election conversation with Mr Trump that the president-elect had been ­“impressed” by Australia’s multi-billion-dollar naval shipbuilding program.

The Prime Minister said he had ­spoken to Mr Trump about ­Australia’s commitment to ­defence spending and was confident that the economic and security ­relationship between Australia and the US would remain strong under a Trump ­administration.

Additional reporting: Joe Kelly




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MessageSujet: Re: Contrairement à ce qu'il Pensait, l'élection de Trump ne va pas arranger les affaires de Putin.   Ven 18 Nov 2016, 11:13

Les États Unis et l'Ukraine rejettent une proposition russe à l'ONU visant à interdire la destruction des monuments à la gloire du communisme.

https://fr.sputniknews.com/international/201611181028757894-resolution-onu-glorification-nazisme/
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MessageSujet: Re: Contrairement à ce qu'il Pensait, l'élection de Trump ne va pas arranger les affaires de Putin.   Ven 18 Nov 2016, 11:24

Pignon a écrit:
Pourquoi ?  Poutine avait l'intention de partir en conflit avec les US ?
SuperTrump est pote avec Vlad et ça vous énerve  ...

Entre mafieux....
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